Provo Conference Program

 

Provo Front Cover Designed by Nicki Marie Darrington

Designed by Nicki Marie Darrington

Registration Opens on September 5th, 2017

The “SUMMIT” in Provo 2017

Presented by

EMS ASSOCIATES, LLC

Download (PDF, 174KB)

2017 Conference Program

Descriptions submitted by the faculty

 

Ken Bouvier

HazMat Awareness for Rural First Responders – What’s Rolling Through Your Town?

Pre-Conference Workshop

Wednesday, 8:00 am–12:00 pm, 1:00 pm–5:00 pm, Location

Description

 

Hot Car Deaths and Treating Heatstroke

General Session

Thursday, 8:00 am–9:00 am, Grand Ballroom

Description

 

Tragedies – Are We Prepared for the Next 40 Years?

Thursday, 1:00 pm–2:15 pm, Soldier Creek

Friday, 2:30 pm–3:45 pm, Cascade C

Description

 

Motor Vehicle Collisions – On the Highway and Back Roads

Friday, 10:30 am – 11:45 am, Cascade E

Description

 

Brooke Burton

Continuous Improvement in EMS

Friday, 2:30 pm–3:45 pm, Cascade E

Description

 

Amber Coleman

Save a Cop! Cutting Edge Medical Intervention

Pre-Conference Workshop

Wednesday, 7:45 am–5:00 pm, Utah Fire Academy

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Nicki Darrington

Save a Cop! Cutting Edge Medical Intervention

Pre-Conference Workshop

Wednesday, 7:45 am–5:00 pm, Utah Fire Academy

 

Jason Dush 

My Patient’s in the Water – Now What?

Pre-Conference Workshop

Wednesday, 7:00 am–11:00 pm, 12:00 pm–4:00 pm, Provo City Rec Center Pool

Description

 

I Can’t Believe They Don’t Use Butter – Burn Care 101

Thursday, 10:30 am–11:45 am, Cascade A–B

Description

 

Who’d a Thought?  The New Trends of Chemical Suicide

Thursday, 1:00 pm–2:15 pm, Ballroom C

Description

 

Dealing With Patients in Police Custody

Friday, 10:30 am–11:45 am, Grand Ballroom

Description

 

EMS and Nursing – Tension vs Teamwork

Power General

Saturday, 9:15 am–9:45 am, Grand Ballroom

Description

 

Creating a Culture of Civility – Challenges, Chaos, and Recommendations

Saturday, 1:00 pm–2:15 pm, Ballroom C

Description

 

Airway Case Studies – When the Simplest Thing Made the Biggest Difference

Saturday, 2:30 pm–3:45 pm, Cascade E

Description

 

Chris Ebright

Russian Roulette – The American Way

Thursday, 1:00 pm–2:15 pm, Cascade C

Description

 

The Perils of Suspension Trauma

Thursday, 2:30 pm–3:15 pm, Cascade D

Description

 

The Night Joe’s Crab Shack Almost Changed Everything

Friday, 10:30 am–11:45 am, Cascade D

Description

 

Pediatric Status Asthmaticus

Friday, 1:00 pm–2:15 pm, Cascade B

Description

 

Hit Me With Your Best Shot

Saturday, 10:30 am–11:45 am, Ballroom A

Description

 

The Final Collision

Saturday, 1:00 pm–2:15 pm, Cascade D

Description

 

Jess Fulkerson 

A Long Way to Go and a Short Time to Get There

Thursday, 1:00 pm, Cascade E

In rural EMS, the “platinum ten” and “golden hour” are concepts that can seem like fantasies. As a rural EMS provider, you always know you’ve got a long way to go and a short time to get there. Most times there’s plenty to do! But what exactly are you doing during that time? What principles guide your care on those long transports? Do you care differently for a critical patient vs. a stable patient? What do you do when “there’s nothing left to do”? This session talks about the fulfilling nature of EMS systems where long transports are the norm and their unique challenges in providing care. We’ll also talk about how current EMT curriculum ignores this issue, and how to train to be most effective in this environment. Intended for First Responders, EMT’s, and Paramedics.

 

I’ve Arrived at an MCI! Now What?

Thursday, 2:30 pm–3:45 pm, Ballroom A

This presentation takes you past how to do S.T.A.R.T. Triage. It teaches the responder how to establish the supervisory positions of Incident Command, Medical Command, Triage, Treatment, Transport, and Safety with the first two or three arriving units. The EMT will walk away with knowledge in how to provide a size-up, how to effectively staff staging areas, and incorporate Air Medical into an effective Incident Management Plan. We will talk about how to manage the MCI when staffing is limited, as well as balancing patient care vs. scene management when EMS is overwhelmed. Interactive demonstrations and a get-out-of-your-seat-and-try-it atmosphere are the way we learn in this presentation. Approximately 1 hour. PowerPoint presentation with student interaction. Intended for First Responders, EMT’s, Paramedics, and Command Officers.

 

So . . . Don’t Touch . . . ANYTHING!

Friday, 10:30 am–11:45 am, Ballroom C

Have you ever found yourself dealing with a family member of a patient who died in the prehospital setting? Did you feel like you had a good plan of what to say and how to say it? As EMS professionals, we are often undertrained in how best to handle these difficult situations. The participant will walk away with an understanding of: why and how people grieve, what to say and what NOT TO SAY to grieving family members, and how to break the worst news in the best possible way. Intended for EMTs, Paramedics, and ER Staff, this one-hour session uses frank discussion and a bit of humor to make a dark topic a bit brighter. Intended for First Responders, EMT’s, Paramedics, and ER staff.

 

Pull the Trigger – Decision-Making in Airway Management

Friday, 1:00 pm–2:15 pm, Cascade D

This session addresses something that prevails in our profession, but few delve into beyond complaining about it. Every EMS system has a person who is difficult to work with. It could be that one Paramedic, maybe an ER Nurse, perhaps an EMT we see every day. Sometimes . . . it’s you. There’s a chain of patient care, and every link needs to be a strong connection to the next. We’ll look deeper into the issue of how good people become weak links in that chain of care. We’ll talk about strategies to avoid letting conflict affect patient care. And we’ll place a mirror in front of ourselves and ask the question: “Could I be doing better?” Intended for First Responders, EMT’s, Paramedics, and ER Staff.

 

Crawl Inside Their Craniums – Part 1

Saturday, 10:30 am–11:45 am, Ballroom C

This course focuses on how to mentally prepare for calls through the use of imagery (visualization). During a call the effects of stress can decrease our effectiveness and even paralyze us in our efforts to render assistance. The presentation talks about how to pre-empt stress by giving responders tools with which to inoculate themselves ahead of time. They will see results in decreased anxiety before calls, lower stress response during incidents, increased success while on-scene, and positive attitude formation. We will talk about visualizing success in bad situations, positive self-talk, and even using imagery as a teaching tool for new or inexperienced providers. Approximately 1 hour. PowerPoint presentation with instructor-guided exercises. Intended for First Responders, EMT’s, Paramedics, and ER staff.

 

Crawl Inside Their Craniums – Part 2

Saturday, 2:30 pm–3:45 pm, Cascade C

It’s a common occurrence for EMS to respond to diabetes emergencies. With the increasing prevalence of diabetes in our society, it’s just going to get more common! Whether it’s Type 1 or Type 2 diabetes, there can be more to these patients than meets the eye! In this presentation, we take both types of diabetes apart. We not only talk about what we see as emergency responders, but also about what’s going on physiologically and psychologically from the perspective of the diabetic. We gain a greater appreciation of the complexities of diabetes care, as well as a simplified approach for treating all types of diabetes-related emergencies. This class is intended for First Responders, EMT’s, Paramedics, and RN’s. Taught by a diabetic, with interactive discussion and first-hand examples, this lecture will have you walking away with all the mystery taken out of Diabetes Management.

 

Ricky Hardman 

Tactical Casualty Care

Pre-Conference Workshop

Wednesday, 8:00 am–5:00 pm, Location

Tactical Casualty Care teaches public safety first responders including EMS, firefighters, law enforcement officers and other first responders the basic medical care interventions that will help save an injured responder’s life until EMS practitioners can safely enter a tactical scene. It combines the principles of Pre-Hospital Trauma Life Support (PHTLS) and Tactical Combat Casualty Care (TCCC), and meets the recommendations of the Hartford Consensus documents and principles. 

These concepts and guidelines, initially instituted by American Special Operations soldiers, were born on the battlefield and have been successful in decreasing the mortality rate, not just for military casualties, but also for EMS, law enforcement and other first responders.

The Tactical Casualty Care training has become the national and international “Gold Standard” of training for military, EMS, law enforcement and other first responders for basic tactical medical care for self-aid and buddy aid.

The course is an 8-hour class that includes lecture, hands-on and scenario based training, with the participants receiving certification issued by the National Association of EMTs (NAEMT), valid for 4 years.

 

Brandon Heggie

Make It Stop! Down and Dirty Bleeding Control

Thursday, 10:30 am–11:45 am, Cascade E

Saturday, 10:30 am–11:45 am, Cascade E

Description

 

Well, That’s Just Smashing . . .

Thursday, 2:30 pm–3:15 pm, Cascade A–B

Saturday, 1:00 pm–2:15 pm, Soldier Creek

Description

 

Man vs Machine

Friday, 10:30 am–11:45 am, Cascade C

Description

 

It Hurts to Think

Friday, 1:00 pm–2:15 pm, Ballroom C

Description

 

Keith Karren, PhD

 

Ricky Kue, MD

 

Management of Traumatic Amputations

Thursday, 1:00 pm–2:15 pm, Cascade D

Saturday, 10:30 am–11:45 am, Cascade D

Description

 

EMS Management of Less Lethal Weapon Injuries

Thursday, 2:30 pm–3:45 pm, Soldier Creek

Description

 

Interesting EMS Cases

Friday, 10:30 am–11:45 am, Ballroom A

Description

 

Tourniquets 101 – Everything You Need to Know

Friday, 1:00 pm–2:15 pm, Ballroom A

Description

 

EMS Response to the Boston Marathon Bombings – Lessons Learned

Final Closing Session

Saturday, 4:00 pm–5:00 pm, Grand Ballroom

Description

 

Dan Limmer 

Scene Safety – A New Paradigm for New Threats

Thursday, 10:30 am–11:45 am, Cascade D

Description

 

Now I Lay Me Down to Sleep – Case Studies in Suicide

Thursday, 2:30 pm–3:45 pm, Cascade C

Description

 

Fast and Furious

Closing General Session

Friday, 4:15 pm–5:45 pm, Grand Ballroom

Description

 

Gray Areas – How Our Seniors Slip Through the Clinical Cracks

Friday, 10:30 am–11:45 am, Cascade A–B

Description

 

Misconceptions, Misperceptions, and Misadventures in EMS

Friday, 2:30 pm–3:45 pm, Ballroom B

Description

 

Compassion, Commitment, and a Clinical Clue – The Three C’s of a Successful EMS Provider

Saturday, 10:30 am–11:45 am, Soldier Creek

Description

 

 Jeffrey Long

 

From First Responder to Battlefield Casualty

Power General

Saturday, 8:15 am–8:45 am, Grand Ballroom

Description

 

 Amber Dawn Martin

 

Elle Martin

 

Tactical Casualty Care

Pre-Conference Workshop

Wednesday, 8:00 am–5:00 pm, Location

Tactical Casualty Care teaches public safety first responders including EMS, firefighters, law enforcement officers and other first responders the basic medical care interventions that will help save an injured responder’s life until EMS practitioners can safely enter a tactical scene. It combines the principles of Pre-Hospital Trauma Life Support (PHTLS) and Tactical Combat Casualty Care (TCCC), and meets the recommendations of the Hartford Consensus documents and principles. 

These concepts and guidelines, initially instituted by American Special Operations soldiers, were born on the battlefield and have been successful in decreasing the mortality rate, not just for military casualties, but also for EMS, law enforcement, and other first responders.

The Tactical Casualty Care training has become the national and international “Gold Standard” of training for military, EMS, law enforcement and other first responders for basic tactical medical care for self-aid and buddy aid.

The course is an 8-hour class that includes lecture, hands-on and scenario based training, with the participants receiving certification issued by the National Association of EMTs (NAEMT), valid for 4 years.

 

Kevin McCarthy _

 

John McCombs 

Tactical Casualty Care

Pre-Conference Workshop

Wednesday, 8:00 am–5:00 pm, Location

Tactical Casualty Care teaches public safety first responders including EMS, firefighters, law enforcement officers and other first responders the basic medical care interventions that will help save an injured responder’s life until EMS practitioners can safely enter a tactical scene. It combines the principles of Pre-Hospital Trauma Life Support (PHTLS) and Tactical Combat Casualty Care (TCCC), and meets the recommendations of the Hartford Consensus documents and principles. 

These concepts and guidelines, initially instituted by American Special Operations soldiers, were born on the battlefield and have been successful in decreasing the mortality rate, not just for military casualties, but also for EMS, law enforcement, and other first responders.

The Tactical Casualty Care training has become the national and international “Gold Standard” of training for military, EMS, law enforcement and other first responders for basic tactical medical care for self-aid and buddy aid.

The course is an 8-hour class that includes lecture, hands-on and scenario based training, with the participants receiving certification issued by the National Association of EMTs (NAEMT), valid for 4 years.

 

Dan Merrill

Diabetes – Why Don’t You Just Control It?

Saturday, 2:30 pm–3:45 pm, Cascade D

Description

 

Joe Mistovich

Obstetrics – Intrapartum Emergencies

Thursday, 10:30 am–11:45 am, Ballroom A

Description

 

Newborn Care and Resuscitation

Thursday, 1:00 pm–2:15 pm, Ballroom A

Description

 

Clinical Insights – Making Your Assessment More Accurate

General Session

Friday, 8:00 am–9:00 am, Grand Ballroom

Description

 

Chest Trauma Differential Diagnosis

Friday, 1:00 pm–2:15 pm, Cascade A–B

Description

 

Incomplete Spinal Cord Injury and Spine Motion Restriction

Saturday, 10:30 am–11:45 am, Cascade A–B

Description

 

Assessment and Management of Head Injury

Saturday, 1:00 pm–2:15 pm, Cascade A–B

Description

 

Doug Murdock, MD

Inverted in Nutty Putty Cave – A True Story of Gravity vs the Mind

Power General

Saturday, 7:45 am–8:15 am, Grand Ballroom

Description

 

Jon Politis

Tuning for Trauma! Fast, Accurate Assessment for EMT’s and First Responders

Pre-Conference Workshop

Wednesday, 8:00 am–12:00 pm, 1:00 pm–5:00 pm, Location

This is a “hands on” workshop teaching the finer points of physical assessment and clinically focused surface anatomy. Starting at the head, we go all the way to the toes and learn how to find structures like the cricothyroid membrane, the angle of Louis, the lung bases . . . often talked about, but few can really locate. Even highly experienced providers walk away amazed at what they have learned to sharpen their assessment skills.

 

Busted! Managing UPPER Extremity Fractures and Dislocations CONFIDENTLY

Thursday, 10:30 am–11:45 am, Ballroom C

Thursday, 1:00 pm–2:15 pm, Cascade A–B

Getting off of an emergency scene in ten minutes or less is a lot easier said than done. A lot of the things we do take time and some take more time than others! What are some of the tricks of the trade that can be used to help you move faster? Are there better ways to organize, to select more appropriate procedures? This presentation covers techniques and “tricks of the trade” to help all levels of EMS providers get off the scene faster.

 

The Hard Way

General Session

Friday, 9:00 am–10:00 am, Ballroom C

All those squiggly lines! At first, it’s very intimidating, but it’s really not all that complicated. Many EMTs today are expected to acquire and transmit a 12-lead in their system. This session will help any EMT learn to apply the electrodes accurately and acquire and transmit a 12-lead ECG. In addition, basic analysis of the 12-lead for S-T elevation and depression will be covered – and what it all means! This is a great primer and you will walk away feeling very comfortable with 12 leads and what it all means. TRUST ME! It’s really not that complicated!

 

First in at the Big One – Those First Critical Minutes

Friday, 2:30 pm–3:45 pm, Ballroom A

It seems innocuous enough, the patient is just refusing medical attention and transportation. But did you know this situation (and a few others) are “high risk” for potential litigation? The field refusal and the release forms we typically use often provide little if any protection for rescuers. This presentation is an overview of the issues surrounding refusals and offers positive suggestions on how to reduce your risk.

 

Mastering Triage

Saturday, 10:30 am–11:45 am, Ballroom B

Looking at a shoebox and meds and trying to sort them all out can be daunting. But those meds are usually the key to their medical history. This session covers some of the most common prescription meds and why your patients may be taking them . . . cardiac meds, antihypertensives, statins, diuretics, anticoagulants, psychoactive, pulmonary, and common pain medications.

 

Vehicle Extraction 2017 – Not Your Dad’s Extraction Anymore

Saturday, 2:30 pm–3:45 pm, Ballroom A

EMTs and Paramedics spend hundreds of hours in training today, yet are often lacking in one of the most important skills of all; driving a patient to the hospital. If you’ve ever been bounced around in an ambulance or been unable to take vitals or do a chart, you are being driven too aggressively! Your driver needs to learn the concepts of LOW FORCE vehicle operation. This session is the “ground school” training for EMS personnel to learn the techniques of low force driving and give you and Mrs. Smith a smooth ride to the hospital.

 

Sean D. Reyes 

Human Trafficking and First Responders – Are We Looking at a Potential “Bigger Picture”?

Closing General Session

Friday, 4:15 pm–5:15 pm, Grand Ballroom

Description

 

Mark Sawdon 

The Fabrication of Cardiac Arrest Resuscitation

Pre-Conference Workshop

Wednesday, 8:00 am–12:00 pm, 1:00 pm–5:00 pm, Location

Description

 

The 1.7-Second Differential

Thursday, 10:30 am–11:45 am, Ballroom B

Saturday, 2:30 pm–3:45 pm, Ballroom B

Description

 

What Do I Really Need to Know About This 12-Lead?

Thursday, 1:00 pm–2:15 pm, Ballroom B

Description

 

Controlling the Chaos of Resuscitation

Friday, 10:30 am–11:45 am, Soldier Creek

Saturday, 1:00 pm–2:15 pm, Ballroom A

Description

 

The Risk of the In-Between

Friday, 2:30 pm–3:45 pm, Cascade D

Description

 

Dan Schwartz

The Fabrication of Cardiac Arrest Resuscitation

Pre-Conference Workshop

Wednesday, 8:00 am–12:00 pm, 1:00 pm–5:00 pm, Location

Description

 

Beyond the Gear – Keeping Your Team Ready

Thursday, 10:30 am–11:45 am, Soldier Creek

Description

 

The Patient Interview as Conversation – More Than Just OPQRST

Thursday, 2:30 pm–3:45 pm, Ballroom B

Description

 

The Patient is Complaining of Difficulty Breathing – Now What?

Friday, 1:00 pm–2:15 pm, Cascade E

Saturday, 1:00 pm–2:15 pm, Cascade E

Description

 

What Your Control Doc Wishes You Knew About Sepsis

Friday, 2:30 pm–3:45 pm, Soldier Creek

Saturday, 2:30 pm–3:45 pm, Soldier Creek

Description

 

Andrea Sjaardema

Bizarre and Unusual Case Studies – You Can’t Make This Stuff Up

Thursday, 2:30 pm–3:45 pm, Ballroom C

Description

 

That’s a SHOCKER

Friday, 1:00 pm–2:15 pm, Soldier Creek

Description

 

Crash Test Dummies and Football Players

Friday, 2:30 pm–3:45 pm, Ballroom C

Saturday, 10:30 am–11:45 am, Location

Description

 

That SMELL . . . That LOOK . . . Now Treat It

Saturday, 1:00 pm–2:15 pm, Ballroom B

Description

 

Little Tykes Are NOT Little Adults

Saturday, 2:30 pm–3:45 pm, Cascade A–B

Description

 

John Tiegen

The Inside Account of What Really Happened in Benghazi

General Session

Saturday, 9:00 am–10:00 am, Grand Ballroom

Description

 

Paul Werfel 

Cases to Challenge Your Mind

Thursday, 10:30 am–11:45 am, Cascade C

Description

 

When Your Golden Years Begin to Tarnish – Geriatric Emergencies

Thursday, 2:30 am–3:45 am, Cascade E

Description

 

Non-Arrhythmic Complications of MI

Friday, 1:00 pm–2:15 pm, Ballroom B

Description

 

Altitude Emergencies

Friday, 2:30 am–3:45 am, Cascade A–B

Description

 

Geriatric EMS Case Studies

Saturday, 1:00 pm–2:15 pm, Cascade C

Description

 

Pediatric Trauma – Pearls for the Prehospital Provider

Saturday, 2:30 pm–3:45 pm, Location

Description

 

Dean York

 

Justin Young

 

Tactical Casualty Care

Pre-Conference Workshop

Wednesday, 8:00 am–5:00 pm, Location

Tactical Casualty Care teaches public safety first responders including EMS, firefighters, law enforcement officers and other first responders the basic medical care interventions that will help save an injured responder’s life until EMS practitioners can safely enter a tactical scene. It combines the principles of Pre-Hospital Trauma Life Support (PHTLS) and Tactical Combat Casualty Care (TCCC), and meets the recommendations of the Hartford Consensus documents and principles. 

These concepts and guidelines, initially instituted by American Special Operation’s soldiers, were born on the battlefield and have been successful in decreasing the mortality rate, not just for military casualties, but also for EMS, law enforcement, and other first responders.

The Tactical Casualty Care training has become the national and international “Gold Standard” of training for military, EMS, law enforcement and other first responders for basic tactical medical care for self-aid and buddy aid.

The course is an 8-hour class that includes lecture, hands-on and scenario based training, with the participants receiving certification issued by the National Association of EMTs (NAEMT), valid for 4 years.

 

To Give or NOT to Give – Fluid Resuscitation and Hypovolemic Shock

Power General

Saturday, 8:45 am–9:15 am, Grand Ballroom

Description

 

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