Provo Utah – November 07-10, 2018

EMS Conference Associates Annual Conference Room Block

Start date: 11/5/18
End date: 11/11/18
Last day to book: 10/16/18

Marriott hotel(s) offering your special group rate:

Provo Marriott Hotel & Conference Center  for 118.00 USD  per night (Click Link Below to Book)

Book your group rate for EMS Conference Associates Annual Conference Room Block

42nd Annual

The "SUMMIT" in Provo Pricing & Program

Attendees Please use the button above to go to the registration site.

Exhibitors, Please use this button to Register

But if needed go here for printable PDF

 2018 Exhibitor Registration Form FINAL 061318

Sponsors, Please use this button to Register

Find a PDF with pricing and contact information here

Sponsorship Program Provo 2018

 

Preconference Sessions
All Precon Sessions are held on

Wednesday, November 7, 2018

Pricing Total
Early Bird Prices end 30 Oct 2018
Trapped!

Instructors:  Justin Capaul, 2nd Due, LLC

Wednesday, November 7 – 2 repeating sessions offered (4-hour Precon)

8:00 am–12:00 pm, 1:00 pm–5:00 pm – (limit 30 per session)

Early Bird Price Reg Price
(Precon Session ONLY) Price $159 $179  
Take the EMS Classroom from Drag to Dynamic

Instructor:  Dan Limmer

Wednesday, November 7 – 2 repeating sessions offered (4-hour Precon)

8:00 am–12:00 pm, 1:00 pm–5:00 pm – (limit to room capacity)

     
(Precon Session ONLY) Price $129 $149  
The Wilderness and You – Who Will Eat Who?

Instructor:  Doug Murdock, MD

Wednesday, November 7 – (8-hour Precon)

8:00 am–5:00 pm – (limit 30)

     
(Precon Session ONLY) Price $189 $209  
Rescue Task Force

Instructor:  Justin Young, Ricky Hardman, Elle Martin

Wednesday, November 7 – (8-hour Precon)

8:00 am–5:00 pm – (limit 30)

     
(Precon Session ONLY) Price $189 $209  
Vehicle and Mass Transportation (Bus) Extrication – Practical Skills Station Course

Instructor:  Jeff Gates, LN Curtis, LLC

Wednesday, November 7 – (8-hour Precon)

8:00 am–5:00 pm (may go to 5:30 pm) – (limit 35)

     
(Precon Session ONLY) Price $189 $209  
Main Conference Options
Thursday, Friday, Saturday – Generals & Breakouts Early Bird Price Reg Price
(Thursday, Friday, AND Saturday) Price $329 $349  
(Thursday, Friday, OR Saturday) Individual Day Price $189 $209  
Note:  If you choose the 3-day conference and one 4-hour Precon, you can ADD an additional 4-hour Precon Session for $99 . . . (be sure they don’t conflict in time)      
     
     
Website: www.emsassociates.com

Facebook: www.facebook.com/emsassociates

Twitter:  @emsassociates

Instagram:  @emsassociates

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Pre-Conference Workshops

Open to ALL Levels of Responders

Wednesday—November 7, 2018

Time Presentation Topic Presenter Room Track
7:00 AM Pre-Conference Registration UVCC ExhibitHall
– Pre-Conference Workshop –
8:00 AM

–12:00 PM

Trapped! Justin Capaul

2nd Due, LLC

Basic & Adv
1:00 PM

--5:00 PM

Trapped! Justin Capaul

2nd Due, LLC

Basic & Adv
– Pre-Conference Workshop –
8:00 AM

–12:00 PM

Taking the EMS Classroom from Drag to Dynamic Dan Limmer Basic & Adv
1:00 PM

–5:00 PM

Taking the EMS Classroom from Drag to Dynamic Dan Limmer Basic & Adv
– Pre-Conference Workshop –
8:00 AM

–5:00 PM

The Wilderness and You – Who Will Eat Who? Doug Murdock Basic & Adv
– Pre-Conference Workshop –
8:00 AM

–5:00 PM

 

Rescue Task Force

 

Justin Young

Ricky Hardman

Elle Martin

American Fork High School Basic & Adv

LEO

Dispatcher

– Pre-Conference Workshop –
8:00 AM

–5:00 PM

Vehicle and Mass Transportation (Bus) Extrication – Practical Skills Station Course Jeff Gates, LN Curtis, LLC

Jason Branson

Basic & Adv

LEO

Thursday—November 8, 2018
General Sessions
Time Presentation Topic  Instructor Room Track
7:00 AM

–7:30 AM

Break – Visit Exhibit Hall
7:30 AM Welcome and Introductions

Honor Guard – Provo City Fire Department

EMS Associates Grand Ballroom Basic & Adv
8:00 AM

–9:00 AM

When the Grim Reaper Wins – An EMS Providers Approach to Death with Dignity Dan Limmer Grand Ballroom Basic & Adv
9:00 AM

–10:00 AM

The October 1 Music Festival Tragedy in Las Vegas Mike Barnum, MD Grand Ballroom Basic & Adv
10:00 AM

–10:30 AM

Break – Visit Exhibit Hall
Thursday – 10:30 AM–11:30 AM – Concurrent Breakout Sessions
Time Presentation Topic Instructor Room Track
10:30 AM

–11:30 AM

Tragedies – World Disasters Over 40 Years Ken Bouvier Ballroom A Basic & Adv
Five Ways to Save Your Volunteer EMS Organization Dan Limmer Ballroom C Basic & Adv
Some Bad Places to Be In (on the Farm) Eric Rickenbach Cascade C Basic & Adv
Crushing Issues in Trauma Travis Martin Cascade D Basic & Adv
Fentanyl Fact and Fiction – The Rise of America’s Narcotics Crisis Daniel Batsie Cascade A-B Basic & Adv
Chest Trauma Differential Diagnosis Joe Mistovich Cascade E Basic & Adv
When Things Go South Dave Wilkey Ballroom B Basic & Adv
11:30 AM

–12:45 PM

Lunch – On Your Own

Break – Visit Exhibit Hall

Thursday – 12:45 PM–1:45 PM – Concurrent Breakout Sessions
Time Presentation Topic Instructor Room Track
12:45 PM

–1:45 PM

Treating Fire Fighters Injuries Ken Bouvier Ballroom A Basic & Adv
Curbside to Bedside – Pediatric Trauma Case Studies Jason Dush Cascade A-B Basic & Adv
Blood & Guts – An EMT’s Guide to Recognizing and Treating Gastrointestinal Bleeding Daniel Batsie Cascade C Basic & Adv
Are We Really on the Same Page? Eric Rickenbach Cascade D Basic & Adv
Leading with Organization Respect James Miguel Ballroom B Basic & Adv
The Insider’s Perspective Travis Martin Cascade E Basic & Adv
Electrical Hazards Scott Bunker

 

Ballroom C Basic & Adv
Thursday – 2:00 PM–3:00 PM – Concurrent Breakout Sessions
Time Presentation Topic Instructor Room Track
2:00 PM

–3:00 PM

EMS and Evidence Based Medicine Mike Barnum, MD Cascade E Basic & Adv
Good Tractors Are Red – Bad Tractors Are Green Eric Rickenbach Cascade D Basic & Adv
Breathing in that Farm-Fresh Country Air Travis Martin Cascade C Basic & Adv
Man vs. Machine – ATV Trauma Case Studies Jason Dush Cascade A-B Basic & Adv
Assessment and Management of Head Injury Joe Mistovich Ballroom A Basic & Adv
Best Practices in Test Item Development Greg Applegate Ballroom C Basic & Adv
Electrical Hazards Scott Bunker

 

Ballroom B Basic & Adv
3:00 PM

–3:30 PM

Break – Visit Exhibit Hall
Thursday – 3:30 PM–4:45 PM – Closing General Session
Time Presentation Topic Instructor Room Track
3:30 PM

–4:45 PM

Ensuring an Ethical Organization James Miguel Grand Ballroom Basic & Adv
Friday—November 9, 2018
General Sessions
Time Presentation Topic Instructor Room Track
7:00 AM

–8:00 AM

Break – Visit Exhibit Hall
8:00 AM

–9:00 AM

Surviving the Perfect Storm – Public Safety Approach to Mass Disasters Jason Dush Grand Ballroom Basic & Adv

 

9:00 AM

–10:00 AM

Rodeo Injuries – How to Fix a Broken Cowboy Ken Bouvier Grand Ballroom Basic & Adv

 

10:00 AM

–10:30 AM

Break – Visit Exhibit Hall
Friday – 10:30 AM–11:30 AM – Concurrent Breakout Sessions
Time Presentation Topic Instructor Room Track
 10:30 AM

–11:30 AM

Industrial Accidents – An Ounce of Preparation Mike Barnum, MD Cascade A-B Basic & Adv
Farmers and EMS Providers – Cut from the Same Cloth Eric Rickenbach Cascade E Basic & Adv
The Insider’s Perspective Travis Martin Ballroom B Basic & Adv
The Golden Hour – STEMI and Stroke Jason Dush Cascade D Basic & Adv

 

Incomplete Spinal Cord Injuries and Spinal Motion Restriction Joe Mistovich Cascade C Basic & Adv
Mind–Body–Spirit – The Triple Bond of Optimal Wellness Keith Karren Ballroom C Basic & Adv
The Good, the Bad, and the Gut – Abdominal Case Management for the EMT Kevin McCarthy Ballroom A Basic & Adv
11:30 AM

–12:45 PM

Lunch – On Your Own

Break – Visit Exhibit Hall

Friday – 12:45 PM–1:45 PM – Concurrent Breakout Sessions
Time Presentation Topic Instructor Room Track
12:45 PM

–1:45 PM

The Opioid Crisis and EMS – Beyond Narcan Mike Barnum, MD Cascade A-B Basic & Adv

Lifesavers Anonymous

Dan Limmer Ballroom B Basic & Adv
Breathing in That Farm-Fresh Country Air Travis Martin Cascade C Basic & Adv
Toxicology and the EMT – What Every EMT Should Know About Toxicological Emergencies Daniel Batsie Ballroom A Basic & Adv
Diabetic Emergencies – Pathophysiology, Assessment and Management Joe Mistovich Ballroom C Basic & Adv
OB Field Deliveries Mike Rhodes, MD Cascade D Basic & Adv
Blue Is Bad, Air Is Gold! Seven Nuggets for Improved Airway Management Kevin McCarthy Cascade E Basic & Adv
Friday – 2:00 PM–3:00 PM – Concurrent Breakout Sessions
Time Presentation Topic Instructor Room Track
2:00 PM

–3:00 PM

Household Hazardous Materials – What’s Under Your Kitchen Sink? Ken Bouvier Ballroom A Basic & Adv
Seven Things I Wasn’t Taught in My EMT Class Dan Limmer Ballroom B Basic & Adv
Some Bad Places to Be In (on the Farm) Erick Rickenbach Cascade E Basic & Adv
Breathing in That Farm-Fresh Country Air Travis Martin Cascade D Basic & Adv
Emergency Evacuations – Preparing for the Worst Ed West, MD Cascade A-B Basic & Adv
Blast Injuries and Explosive Trauma Daniel Batsie Cascade C Basic & Adv
Emergencies in OB Field Deliveries – What to Look For Mike Rhodes, MD Ballroom C Basic & Adv
3:00 PM

–3:30 PM

Break – Visit Exhibit Hall
Friday – 3:30 PM–4:45 PM – Closing General Session
Time Presentation Topic Instructor Room Track
3:30 PM

–4:45 PM

Hospital Incident Command System and EMS – Working Together During the California Fires Ed West, MD Grand Ballroom Basic & Adv
5:00 PM

–5:30 PM

Break – Visit Exhibit Hall
Saturday—November 10, 2018
Power Generals
lTime Presentation Topic Instructor Room Track
7:00 AM

–8:00 AM

Break – Visit Vendor Hall
8:00 AM

–8:45 AM

Not Your Grandparents’ Automobile Eric Rickenbach Grand Ballroom Basic & Adv
8:45 AM

–9:30 AM

Traumatic Brain Injuries Howard Reichman, MD Grand Ballroom Basic & Adv
9:30 AM

–10:15 AM

Life’s Challenges and Survival Josh Holt Grand Ballroom Basic & Adv
10:15 AM

–10:45 AM

Break – Visit Exhibit Hall
Saturday – 10:45 AM–11:45 AM – Concurrent Breakout Sessions
Time Presentation Topic Instructor Room Track
10:45 AM

–11:45 AM

The Opioid Crisis and EMS – Beyond Narcan Mike Barnum, MD Cascade A-B Basic & Adv
Seatbelt Injuries Ken Bouvier Ballroom B Basic & Adv
Five Ways to Save Your Volunteer EMS Organization Dan Limmer Ballroom C Basic & Adv
Good Tractors Are Red – Bad Tractors Are Green Eric Rickenbach Ballroom A Basic & Adv
Crushing Issues in Trauma Travis Martin Cascade C Basic & Adv
Street Sense – Protecting Yourself While Saving Your Patient Jason Dush Cascade D Basic & Adv
Cascade E Basic & Adv
11:45 PM

–12:45 PM

Lunch – On Your Own

Break – Visit Exhibit Hall

Saturday – 12:45 PM–1:45 PM – Concurrent Breakout Sessions
Time Presentation Topic Instructor Room Track
12:45 PM

–1:45 PM

Household Hazardous Materials – What’s Under Your Kitchen Sink? Ken Bouvier Cascade A-B Basic & Adv
The Elephant in the Room – When Medical Errors Go Bad Jason Dush Cascade C Basic & Adv
Smoke Inhalation – Effects on Humans and Animals Ed West, MD Cascade D Basic & Adv
Acute Coronary Care for the Non-Medic Daniel Batsie Cascade E Basic & Adv
Seizures – More Than a Convulsion Joe Mistovich Ballroom B Basic & Adv
The Powerful Effects of Emotions on Health and Wellness Keith Karren Ballroom C Basic & Adv
IV Skills Class Amber Coleman

Nicki Darrington

Ballroom A Basic & Adv
Saturday – 2:00 PM–3:00 PM – Concurrent Breakout Sessions
Time Presentation Topic Instructor Room Track
2:00 PM

–3:00 PM

Industrial Accidents – An Ounce of Preparation Mike Barnum, MD Cascade A-B Basic & Adv
Seven Things I Wasn’t Taught in My EMT Class Dan Limmer Cascade C Basic & Adv
PTSD – Rebuilding Lives of Survivors Ed West, MD Cascade D Basic & Adv
Blast Injuries and Explosive Trauma Daniel Batsie Ballroom C Basic & Adv
Absolute Failure – When the 3 E’s Don’t Work Lynn Schofield Ballroom B Basic & Adv
Providing the Best Care in the Worst Conditions Kevin Dickerson Cascade E Basic & Adv
IV Skills Class Amber Coleman

Nicki Darrington

Ballroom A Basic & Adv
Saturday – 3:15 PM–4:15 PM – Final Closing Session
Time Presentation Topic Instructor Room Track
3:15 PM

–4:15 PM

Clinical Insights – Making Your Assessment More Accurate Joe Mistovich Grand Ballroom Basic & Adv
4:15 PM

–5:00 PM

END OF CONFERENCE / Completion of Evaluations

2018 Conference Faculty

Greg Applegate Chief Science Officer, National Registry of Emergency Medical Technicians (NREMT); PhD, Education Psychology, MBA. Previously worked for Pearson VUE on the National Council Licensing Examination (NCLEX) Columbus, OH
Mike Barnum MD, FACEP, Medical Director, AMR Las Vegas,

Assistant Director of Emergency Medicine

Valley Hospital Medical Center

 

Las Vegas, NV
Dan Batsie BA, NRP, Chief of EMS, Vermont Department of Health Jericho, VT
Ken Bouvier NREMT-P, Deputy Chief of Operations, New Orleans Emergency Medical Services New Orleans, LA
Scott Bunker Assistant Director, Provo City Power Provo, UT
Justin Capaul 2nd Due, LLC, EMT-I, Kootenai County Fire and Rescue, Idaho State Advocate, Everyone Goes Home campaign thru National Fallen Firefighters Foundation; AA, Fire Science, BA, Business Management; Coordinator for KCFR; Teaches RIT, ROAM, FFI, FFII, and PICO Post Falls, ID
Amber Coleman RN, CFRN, Intermountain Health Care Provo, UT
Nicki Darrington RN – L&D, Intermountain Health Care Provo, UT
Kevin Dickerson Flight Paramedic, Classic Air Medical, Moab; Paramedic, Pleasant Grove Fire Department and Grand County EMS; medical team leader, Utah County Search and Rescue. Pleasant Grove, UT
Jason Dush FF/EMT-P, FP-C, TEMS Austin, TX
Jeff Gates LN Curtis, LLC
Ricky Hardman EMT-B, FF, Engineer (retired), Provo City Fire Dept. Provo, UT
Josh Holt Sandy, UT
Keith Karren, PhD PhD, EMT—Professor Emeritus, Health Science, BYU, EMS author (Prehospital Emergency Care and First Responder, leading Brady texts), Cofounder and conference director–EMS Associates and the Prehospital Emergency Care Conference, EMS and Health Science presenter, original member of SAVERS-Springville Heber City, UT
Dan Limmer Paramedic, Police Officer, EMS Educator and Author; Lecturer, EMS Degree Program at Central Washington University; Co-Founder Limmer Creative LLC Kennebunk, ME
Elle Martin EMT-I, Sgt., LEO, Brigham Young University, Conference Director, EMS Associates Provo, UT
Travis Martin EMT-P, Firefighter Reading, PA
Kevin McCarthy UVU EMS Instructor, NAEMT State Education Coordinator, Fire Captain/Paramedic, (retired) Orem, UT
James Miguel Chief, Provo City Fire Department; MS, Grand Canyon University; Graduate of Executive Fire Officers program and National Fire Academy, Emmitsburg, MD Provo, UT
Joe Mistovich Med, NRP, Chair and Professor, Department of Health Professions, Youngstown State University Youngstown, OH
Doug Murdock, MD MD, FACEP, EMT-I, BSN, Conference Medical Director, EMS Associates Heber City, UT
Howard Reichman, MD Neuro Surgeon, Intermountain Health Care Provo, UT
Michael Rhodes, MD Assistant Medical Director, Family Practice Physician, Intermountain Health Care Provo, UT
Eric Rickenbach EMT, Senior Instructor, Penn State University, Manager Agricultural Emergency Programs, Owner, RescueTechs Rehrersburg, PA
Lynn Schofield Battalion Chief, Provo Fire & Rescue, Professional Development Fire Investigator Provo, UT
Ed West, MD Board Certified in Emergency Medicine, Chief of Staff, Saint Joseph Care Center Santa Rosa, CA
Dave Wilkey Supervisor Gas Operations Central Region Salt Lake City, UT
Justin Young NREMT-P, Firefighter/Investigator, SWAT – Joint Special Operations Group – Master Operator/Paramedic West Jordan, UT

2018 Conference Program

Descriptions submitted by the faculty

 

 

                                                  Greg Applegate                                                 

 

Best Practices in Test Item Development

Thursday, 2:00 PM–3:00 PM, Ballroom C

The quality of a test depends on the quality of its test items. Quality test items allow you to assess your students’ level of knowledge accurately. Come to this session to learn strategies for brainstorming and assessing test content, item writing guidelines to follow, and techniques to build quality control into your test development process. This session is essential content for anyone who makes and uses tests as a part of their job. Activities will include writing and reviewing test items.

 

                                                Mike Barnum, MD                                               

 

The October 1 Music Festival Tragedy in Las Vegas

General Session

Thursday, 09:00 AM–10:00 AM, Grand Ballroom

The events of 1 October 2017 in Las Vegas presented EMS with many operational challenges. The lessons learned from this event are of value to any EMS agency, not just those likely to respond to incidents at mass gatherings. This presentation seeks to describe how these factors shaped the response as well as to provide potential planning direction and solutions. Specific issues to be covered include: Crowd Movement, Patient Self Transport, Tactical Considerations, Lack of Triage, Hospital Overload

 

EMS and Evidence-Based Medicine

Thursday, 14:00 PM–15:00 PM, Cascade E

EMS is now firmly in the era of evidence-based medicine, which is a good thing. Too many of our providers only hear a negative message. They think EBM is going to result in EMS losing skills such as intubation, trauma care, and even ACLS. In truth, it will result in more demands on assessment skills and create more opportunities to intervene, depending on the situation. These changes will demand more training and professionalism than ever.

 

Industrial Accidents – An Ounce of Preparation

Friday, 10:30 AM–11:30 AM, Cascade A–B

Saturday, 14:00 PM–15:00 PM, Cascade A–B

Industrial accidents present a special consideration for EMS. Planning is the key to undertaking a successful operation in any of these incidents. Some aspects that require forethought are obvious (e.g., HAZMAT) while others are less clear. Areas for considerations will include: Risk assessments, decision making, and training, Interface with industrial rescue teams, Multiphase rescue requirements, Injury specific destination criteria, Emerging modalities (e.g., field amputation)

 

The Opioid Crisis and EMS – Beyond Narcan

Friday, 12:45 PM–13:45 PM, Cascade A–B

Saturday, 10:45 AM–11:45 AM, Cascade A–B

We are in a reactionary phase in the opioid crisis. Narcan has been made widely available and awareness has been raised. But looming cuts in prescription opioid production and prescribing will cause patients to be stuck in the middle, increasing the risk to EMS. Patients angry due to Narcan administration, demands for narcotics, theft, and robbery are all possibilities that EMS must face as this crisis stabilizes.

 

                                                    Daniel Batsie                                                   

 

Fentanyl Fact and Fiction – The Rise of America’s Narcotics Crisis

Thursday, 10:30 AM–11:30 AM, Cascade A–B

The epidemic of narcotic abuse has created a crisis for EMS. More and more each day, practitioners respond to opioid overdoses with an ever increasing scope of practice. Unfortunately, many myths and falsehoods still exist concerning the best practice assessment and treatment of these patients. This class will review the pathophysiology of narcotic abuse and describe a commonsense approach to care. In particular, we will focus on the decision-making process associated with the use of naloxone as well as the approach to narcotic related cardiac arrest. All levels are welcome.

 

Blood & Guts – An EMT’s Guide to Recognizing the Treating Gastrointestinal Bleeding

Thursday, 12:45 PM–13:45 PM, Cascade C

We typically associate hemorrhage with external bleeding and trauma, but hypovolemic shock can be associated with a wide variety of medical disorders that are often far more difficult to recognize. Gastrointestinal bleeding is a known killer and EMTs must be prepared to identify and treat this potentially lethal condition. This class will focus on the pathophysiology of the GI bleed and discuss key recognition features. Particular attention will be given to meaningful interventions within the EMT scope of practice.

 

Toxicology and the EMT – What Every EMT Should Know About Toxicological Emergencies

Friday, 12:45 PM–13:45 PM, Ballroom A

Typically toxicology is a topic presented with advanced life support in mind. Antidotes and interventions are assumed to live only at the paramedic level. In today’s world, however, EMTs are better prepared than ever to address the most common toxicological emergencies. This class will focus on basic toxicological care applied before the arrival of advanced providers. We will discuss common deadly overdoses and poisonings and describe interventions possible at the EMT scope of practice. Although all levels of care are welcome, this class is primarily designed for emergency responders and EMTs.

 

Blast Injuries and Explosive Trauma

Friday, 14:00 PM–15:00 PM, Cascade C

Saturday, 14:00 PM–15:00 PM, Ballroom C

The physics of high-energy explosives can cause devastating injuries to the human body. These situations also pose very specific challenges to resources and to the providers themselves. This class is designed to review the pathophysiology of blast trauma and better prepare all EMS levels to respond to this type of emergency. Topics will include the physics of explosives, specific blast related injuries and a review of best practice treatment strategies.

 

Acute Coronary Care for the Non-Medic

Saturday, 12:45 PM–13:45 PM, Cascade E

The successful treatment of the acute coronary syndrome is truly a team-based approach. This class is designed to introduce the non-paramedic to the lifesaving concepts of cardiac care. Topics will include A&P, 12-lead ECG placement, and a thorough review of the most important treatment modalities. Although all levels of care are welcome, this class is primarily designed for emergency responders, EMTs, and AEMTs.

 

 

                                                     Ken Bouvier                                                    

 

Tragedies – World Disasters Over 40 Years

Thursday, 10:30 am–11:30 am, Ballroom A

Prehospital Care Practitioners will have a better understanding of how EMS and Emergency Rooms have changed over the last 40 years and the big question is, “Are we prepared for the next 40?”

The rising cost of healthcare in the United States and the uncertainty of how people will be able to afford health care and insurance is forcing patients to use EMS and Emergency Rooms as their life-net or primary source of medical care. Americans rank high when it comes to Cardiac Arrest, Hypertension, Diabetes, Obesity and Cancer.

September 11, 2001 changed the lives of Americans forever, and for the past 16 years we have had to respond to tragediesboth natural and man-made. These tragedies have forced EMS and Emergency Rooms to be specially trained for unusual events such as Active Shooters and Acts of Terrorism like the police shootings in Dallas, TX, Baton Rouge, LA, and the Orlando, FL, Pulse Night Club Shooting. During this session we will look at what we really do and show that we do more than give patients a ride in the ambulance!

Chief Bouvier will use a unique PowerPoint slide show to recap 40 years of Tragedies!

Treating Fire Fighters’ Injuries

Thursday, 12:45 pm–1:45 pm, Ballroom A

This session is designed to help responders, fire fighters, EMT’s and paramedics better manage firefighter injuries. Firefighting is one of the world’s most dangerous jobs and accidents in this profession can result in costly losses. The greatest loss being the death of a firefighter.

During this session we explain the two basic factors that motivate accident control efforts. Humane vs. economics, all departments know and understand what it takes to produce the almost perfect firefighter, but they also realize the cost involved. Because of cost, many departments are out of compliance and allow their firefighters to operate unsafe and unhealthy. We will explain the most common types of injuries – how and why they occur; the importance of wearing proper firefighting equipment; using the Incident Command System; and the need for rehabilitation on scene. We will discuss signs and symptoms of firefighter injuries and explain both Basic and Advanced Life Support treatments for firefighter injuries.

 

Rodeo Injuries – How to Fix a Broken Cowboy

General Session

Friday, 9:00 am–10:00 am, Grand Ballroom

This session is designed to help prehospital care practitioners, emergency nurses, and physicians, respiratory, X-ray and lab technicians better understand and manage injuries sustained at the rodeo.

After a long cattle drive in West Texas, cowboys would often demonstrate their riding and roping skills in what came to be known as a rodeo. Records indicate that the first formal rodeo was held in 1872 in Cheyenne, Wyoming and rodeo has continued as one of the competitive sports in the United States where athletes compete for a cash prize. During this session, we explain the different types of injuries sustained in the six (6) main rodeo events. We explain the common injuries that occur while riding saddle and bareback broncos, bull riding, steer wrestling, calf roping, and team roping. You will learn and have a better understanding of the size and weight of the livestock, mechanism of injuries, safety equipment and accidents that happen before, during and after a rodeo. This session uses a unique slideshow and video to show how cowboys become broken!

We discuss both Basic & Advanced Life Support.

 

Household Hazardous Materials – What’s Under Your Kitchen Sink?

Friday, 2:00 pm–3:00 pm, Ballroom A

Saturday, 12:45 pm–1:45 pm, Cascade A–B

When you think of hazardous materials, you think of chemicals like sulfuric acid, gasoline, propane, ammonia, and chlorine. You probably do not consider nail polish, hair spray, drain cleaner, and mothballs as hazardous materials. During this session we discuss the most common products that are kept “Under the Kitchen Sink.”

This session is designed to inform first responders, EMT’s, paramedics, nurses, and physicians of the dangers of Household Hazmat. During this session we take a look at how people become injured while using common household products that are stored under the kitchen sink. We also discuss how small children often play under the sink and get exposed by accident. We discuss products like drain cleaner, bleach, ammonia, medicines, alcohol, hair spray, nail polish, mothballs, insect spray, shoe polish, deodorant, paint thinner, and super glue.

We will discuss both BLS and ALS treatment of exposure to “Everything Under the Kitchen Sink.”

 

Seatbelt Injuries

Saturday, 10:45 am–11:45 am, Ballroom B

Seatbelts are used as safety devices in cars, trucks, planes and even amusement rides to provide protection to humans in the event of a collision or equipment failure. While seatbelts have been proven to save lives, there have been incidents where people have suffered severe injuries from wearing a seatbelt; they can cause pressure on the abdomen and chest resulting in serious injury to internal organs.

This session helps prehospital care practitioners, emergency nurses, and physicians, respiratory, X-ray and lab technicians better manage patients suffering from injuries caused by seatbelts. Responders will have to depend on their assessment skills to recognize the injury in many cases and it will require excellent patient care if these patients are going to make it to surgery within the Golden Hour. During this session first responders, EMT’s, paramedics, nurses, and physicians will be amazed by a unique slideshow that shows injuries caused by seatbelts. We discuss how to perform a complete assessment of suspected neck, back and abdominal injuries caused by seatbelts.  We will discuss both BLS & ALS treatment and care.

 

                                                   Jason Branson                                                  

 

Vehicle and Mass Transportation (Bus) Extrication – Practical Skills Station Course

Pre-Conference Workshop

Wednesday, 8:00 am–5:00 pm

 

 

                                         Justin Capaul, 2ndDue, LLC                                        

 

Trapped!

Pre-Conference Workshop

Wednesday, 8:00 am–12:00 pm

Wednesday, 1:00 pm–5:00 pm

People get themselves into precarious situations sometimes. This class covers some of the techniques necessary to provide care and remove a patient from these situations. Students will be faced with five pits that will sharpen their problem solving and teamwork skills. Skills include ring removal, arm in a pipe, hand in a roller press, and several more! Hands-on use of tools is required for every pit. PPE required includes gloves and eye protection.

 

                                               AmberColeman                                              

 

IV Skills Class

Saturday, 10:30 am–11:30 am, Ballroom A

Saturday, 2:00 pm–3:00 pm, Ballroom A

This IV skills class will focus on correct technique for successful placement of an IV. Tips and tricks for troubleshooting difficult IV starts on all age groups will be discussed. Must be 18 years or older to attend.

 

                                                  Nicki Darrington                                                

 

IV Skills Class

Saturday, 10:30 am–11:30 am, Ballroom A

Saturday, 2:00 pm–3:00 pm, Ballroom A

This IV skills class will focus on correct technique for successful placement of an IV. Tips and tricks for troubleshooting difficult IV starts on all age groups will be discussed. Must be 18 years or older to attend.

 

                                                  Kevin Dickerson                                                 

 

Providing the Best Care in the Worst Conditions

Saturday, 2:00 pm–3:00 pm, Cascade E

More and more people are venturing into the backcountry. This is leading to a dramatic increase in medical emergencies in areas difficult to access. Once on scene, treatment now takes on unique challenges.

We will discuss actual case presentations in some of these “Worst Conditions” such as the Moab Slickrock on a 110-degree day, the summit of Timp through a sub-zero night, 800-feet below ground in a cold Cache County Cave, on the shores of a white-water river, and in the middle of Utah Lake.

We will discuss popular backcountry accidents that EMS providers might encounter in their response areas.  We will help you develop your preplan for these emergencies. What equipment will you carry? How will you carry it?  How will you protect your patient (and yourself) from the environment while treating their injuries or illnesses?

We will cover the latest best practices in the treatment of the number one killer of the wilderness . . . hypothermia. This presentation will be valuable for all levels of care providers.

 

                                                Dave Wilkey                                                 

 

When Things Go South

Thursday, 10:30 am–11:30 am, Ballroom B

 

 

                                                      Jason Dush                                                     

 

Curbside to Bedside – Pediatric Trauma Case Studies

Thursday, 12:45 pm–1:45 pm, Cascade A–B

Injury is the number one killer of children in the United States. In 2009, injury accounted for 69.5% of all deaths in children younger than 18 years. The financial burden to society of children who survive childhood injury with disability continues to be enormous. The entire process of managing childhood injury is complex and varies by region. Only the comprehensive cooperation of a broadly diverse group of people will have a significant effect on improving the care and outcome of injured children. This session will address the injuries and illnesses of children and their respective treatment modalities from the scene through ED. There will be an emphasis on collaboration and teamwork to benefit patient care.

 

Man vs. Machine – ATV Trauma Case Studies

Thursday, 2:00 pm–3:00 pm, Cascade A–B

All-terrain vehicles are popular off-road vehicles used for a wide variety of work and recreational activities. Recently, the growing popularity of ATVs and the increasing size and power of the vehicles has led to concern over injury risk. The Consumer Product Safety Commission estimates that ATVs result in more than 100,000 emergency department visits annually, including more than 30,000 injuries for children 16 years of age and younger. During the past decade, more than 200 children died annually due to injuries sustained on ATVs. Children make up a disproportionate number of ATV injuries. This lecture will focus on the most commonly seen injuries as well as management.

 

Surviving the Perfect Storm – Public Safety Approach to Mass Disasters

General Session

Friday, 8:00 am–9:00 am, Grand Ballroom

 

The Golden Hour – STEMI and Stroke

Friday, 10:30 am–11:30 am, Cascade D

The “Golden Hour” is a brief window of time in which critically injured patients are delivered to definitive care at a trauma facility. Years of applying this concept to practice have drastically improved the outcome of traumatic injuries. This same concept can be applied to the care of certain medical conditions as well. Delivering ST Elevation MI (STEMI’s) to a chest pain center and Acute Non-Hemorrhagic stroke (CVA) to a stroke center in a timely manner is becoming a standard of care. The same principles applied to traumatic injuries can be utilized for STEMI’s and CVAs to decrease morbidity and mortality. Rapid assessment and decision-making by EMS and emergency department personnel upon initial patient contact are imperative to utilize this principle of rapid transport to definitive care.

 

Street Sense – Protecting Yourself While Saving Your Patient

Saturday, 10:45 am–11:45 am, Cascade D

In the world of public safety, there are inherent dangers we face every day when we answer the call. That call for help can turn into a dangerous situation for you at any given point. What training do you have for violent encounters? What do your policies and procedures say about handling dangerous situations of physical confrontations with patients or bystanders? In today’s world of public safety, we all have become victims of targeted attacks of violence on crews. Jason brings a realistic approach to this class through case studies and hands-on demonstrations with the audience. Are you prepared as an organization and as individuals to handle these increasing dangers we face?

 

The Elephant in the Room – When Medical Errors Go Bad

Saturday, 2:00 pm–3:00 pm, Cascade C

Think of a time when you heard of, personally know of, or committed a medical error while care was being provided. The number of medical errors that go unreported, unnoticed and covered up is shocking at best. In this enlightening session, Jason takes you on a journey as he uncovers some of the common medical errors and contributing factors that affect patient outcomes.

 

                                           Jeff Gates, LN Curtis, LLC                                          

 

Vehicle and Mass Transportation (Bus) Extrication – Practical Skills Station Course

Pre-Conference Workshop

Wednesday, 8:00 am–5:00 pm

This 8-hour vehicle extrication course will provide hands-on training for rural fire and rescue personnel.  Skill stations will cover scene size-up, dash lift, cribbing & stabilization, and anatomy of mass transportation (bus).  Students will become familiar with rescue tools to safely extricate and provide quality patient care.  You don’t want to miss this class.  NOTE:  Each student enrolled in this precon will be required to have personal protective clothing and gear.

 

                                                   Ricky Hardman                                                  

 

Rescue Task Force

Pre-Conference Workshop

Wednesday, 8:00 am–5:00 pm

This course will address the training and principle guidelines needed for Fire/EMS agencies when tasked with responding to an Active Shooter/Critical Incident Event and can serve as a template for agencies looking for a way to organize a structured response using the Rescue Task Force (RTF) concept that is being introduced at the national level.

This single-day course covers principles of tactical trauma medicine that have been successful in reducing the mortality rate of victims in these types of scenarios as well as how EMS can work jointly with law enforcement to bridge the gap in getting critical medical aid to victims.

The course outline follows the IAFF’s endorsement on Active Shooter Event response and comprises the elements of the National Association of Emergency Medical Technicians (NAEMT) Tactical Combat Casualty Care (TCCC) program, as well as principles from FEMA’s Basic Response to an Active Shooter, Advanced Law Enforcement Rapid Response Training (ALERRT), and Law Enforcement Active Shooter Response (LASER).

 

                                                        Josh Holt                                                       

 

Life’s Challenges and Survival

General Session

Saturday, 9:30 am–10:15 am, Grand Ballroom

 

                                                     Keith Karren                                                    

 

Mind–Body–Spirit – The Triple Bond of Optimal Wellness

Friday, 10:30 am–11:30 am, Ballroom C

Considering the challenging world we all presently live in, is your personal quest for optimal health and wellness a reality? The answer is a resounding ‘YES”! The message of this presentation is best illustrated by Dr. James West, a prominent American Internist:

“Health is a large word. It embraces not the body only, but the mind and spirit as well. . . . and not only today’s pain or pleasure alone, but the whole being and outlook of a man (and woman).”

Wellness, after all, involves a sense of well-being that results from the good health of a balanced body, mind, and spirit. All body organs share the same chemical language and are constantly communicating with each other. Positive emotions produce the molecules that boost the immune system and protect against disease. Negative emotions do just the opposite. This is why you need a foundation of understanding all five dimensions of health and how they interact, placing you in control of your quest for optimum health and wellness.

This presentation will aid you in changing the fabric of your thought, resulting in an adventure that can produce an increased quality of health, wellness, and longevity!

 

The Powerful Effects of Emotions on Health and Wellness

Saturday, 12:45 pm–1:45 pm, Ballroom C

What are emotions and how do they affect our health and well-being? It is difficult to define emotions: is it more than just feelings? Even scientists and researchers have a tough time defining exactly what emotions are. They do agree, however, that emotions have a significant impact on our health and well-being.

Emotional health itself is defined by our ability to understand and be responsive to our emotional experiences. Emotional wellness involves a positive attitude, high self-esteem, a strong sense of self, and the ability to recognize and share a wide range of feelings with others in a constructive way.

 

                                                     Dan Limmer                                                    

 

Taking the EMS Classroom from Drag to Dynamic

Pre-Conference Workshop

Wednesday, 8:00 am – 12:00 pm

Wednesday, 8:00 am – 12:00

The traditional EMS classroom consisting of PowerPoints and skills lab is quickly becoming a thing of the past. Educators are embracing a newer, more dynamic model. It can be called flipped, hybrid, and a number of other things, but educators are looking to provide better education and deeper understanding—while improving their pass rates on the NREMT. This 4-hour workshop will prepare educators to implement or expand this more dynamic classroom from the moment they leave the session. Working individually and in groups, students will explore dynamic methods and actually create activities that can be used immediately in classes. Dan will share many of his most successful exercises and facilitate the session to provide the knowledge and tools you need to bring your classroom from drag to dynamic.

 

When the Grim Reaper Wins – An EMS Providers Approach to Death with Dignity

General Session

Thursday, 8:00 am – 9:00 am, Grand Ballroom

While our primary mission is to save lives, not every patient is saved. From fatal trauma to terminal illness, EMS has a front row seat to death and dying with minimal preparation for the nonclinical elements of patient and family care. This presentation covers the interpersonal components of EMS at death scenes including death notifications, communication with family, friends and the dying patient; interfacing with the police and hospice, and dealing with the emotions you may feel during and after the call. A compassionate interaction with those left behind by the death of a loved one may be one of the most meaningful things you will ever do in EMS.

 

Five Ways to Save Your Volunteer EMS Organization

Thursday, 10:30 am – 11:30 am, Ballroom C

Saturday, 10:45 am – 11:45 am, Ballroom C

Can volunteerism in EMS survive? It is a question frequently asked in EMS magazines and at national conferences. Utah has a high percentage of volunteer organizations with high quality, dedicated individuals. This presentation focuses on optimizing volunteer organizations to match the needs of both the organization and the people served. Designed to address challenging realities with a practical and hopeful approach, this presentation is for leaders and members of volunteer organizations who want to continue and excel for many years to come.

 

Lifesavers Anonymous

Friday, 12:45 pm – 1:45 pm, Ballroom B

Television shows depict the fire and emergency medical services as constant drama and excitement in stark contrast to real life. What happens when the EMS provider realizes the number of patients we actually save is minimal and the non-serious patients are plentiful? This session presents a strategy for long-term satisfaction as an EMS provider and focuses on patient-centered care and provider well-being. Stay in EMS for the long haul. We need you.

 

Seven Things I Wasn’t Taught in My EMT Class

Friday, 2:00 pm–3:00 pm, Ballroom B

Saturday, 2:00 pm–3:00 pm, Cascade C

What is the difference between an entry-level EMT and a successful EMT? This presentation looks at seven things that help build the EMT you would want to respond if you were ill or injured. Using both concepts and clinical pearls—applicable for the new or experienced EMT—this insightful and practical presentation will help hone your clinical practice of EMS.

 

                                                      Elle Martin                                                     

 

Rescue Task Force

Pre-Conference Workshop

Wednesday, 8:00 am–5:00 pm

This course will address the training and principle guidelines needed for Fire/EMS agencies when tasked with responding to an Active Shooter/Critical Incident Event and can serve as a template for agencies looking for a way to organize a structured response using the Rescue Task Force (RTF) concept that is being introduced at the national level.

This single-day course covers principles of tactical trauma medicine that have been successful in reducing the mortality rate of victims in these types of scenarios as well as how EMS can work jointly with law enforcement to bridge the gap in getting critical medical aid to victims.

The course outline follows the IAFF’s endorsement on Active Shooter Event response and comprises the elements of the National Association of Emergency Medical Technicians (NAEMT) Tactical Combat Casualty Care (TCCC) program, as well as principles from FEMA’s Basic Response to an Active Shooter, Advanced Law Enforcement Rapid Response Training (ALERRT), and Law Enforcement Active Shooter Response (LASER).

 

 

                                                    Travis Martin                                                   

 

Crushing Issues in Trauma

Thursday, 10:30 am–11:30 am, Cascade D

Saturday, 10:45 am–11:45 am, Cascade C

Rural providers may be faced with trapped victims with potential crush syndrome. Handling these cases requires a very coordinated response between all of the agencies involved. This seminar will outline current EMS trends in crush syndrome and discuss patient care priorities necessary for successful outcomes.

 

The Insiders’ Perspective

Thursday, 12:45 pm–1:45 pm, Cascade E

Friday, 10:30 am–11:30 am, Ballroom B

This session focuses on case-appropriate trauma care and extrication by understanding basic trauma criteria and relevant vehicle anatomy. This course provides the student with an awareness-level view of vehicle rescue operations from the “inside rescuer/patient care” perspective. Understanding the “inside perspective” will allow both EMS providers and fire/rescue personnel to better understand each other’s respective roles.

 

Breathing in That Farm-Fresh Country Air

Thursday, 2:00 pm–3:00 pm, Cascade C

Friday, 12:45 pm–1:45 pm, Cascade C

Friday, 2:00 pm–3:00 pm, Cascade D

Day-to-day farmers can be exposed to some very toxic inhalation hazards. They are generally aware of the hazards and take precautions, but sometimes things go bad. This course focuses on injury/illness from long- and short-term exposure to various farm toxins, including but not limited to silo gas, manure gasses, insecticides, pesticides and other farm chemicals. We will discuss disease patterns and prevention methods as well as treatment options.

 

                                                  Kevin McCarthy                                                 

 

The Good, The Bad, and The Gut: Abdominal Case Management for the EMT

Friday, 10:30 am–11:30 am, Ballroom A

Prehospital abdominal cases are a challenge long before confounding factors are introduced. Come and learn some take-a-way gems to improve your patient assessment and care for abdominal pain in the prehospital setting.

 

Blue Is Bad, Air Is Gold! Seven Nuggets for Improved Airway Management

Friday, 12:45 pm–1:45 pm, Cascade E

Prehospital abdominal cases are a challenge long before confounding factors are introduced. Come and learn some take-a-way gems to improve your patient assessment and care for abdominal pain in the prehospital setting.

 

                                                    James Miguel                                                   

 

Leading with Organization Respect

Thursday, 12:45 pm–1:45 pm, Ballroom B

 

Ensuring an Ethical Organization

General Session

Friday, 3:30 pm–4:45 pm, Grand Ballroom

 

                                                    Joe Mistovich                                                   

 

Chest Trauma Differential Diagnosis

Thursday, 10:30 am–11:30 am, Cascade E

Many chest injuries can present with common signs and symptoms of other conditions or other related chest injuries, especially during the initial impression. This session provides a method of quickly identifying the various chest injuries using the most basic information collected in the initial phases of the assessment.

 

Assessment and Management of Head Injury

Thursday, 2:00 pm–3:00 pm, Ballroom A

This session provides a basic understanding of the pathophysiology associated with traumatic brain injury, and a review of clinical assessment findings and prehospital management.

 

Incomplete Spinal Cord Injuries and Spinal Motion Restriction

Friday, 10:30 am–11:30 am, Cascade C

This session provides an easy approach to understanding incomplete spinal cord injury and the application to the clinical assessment and findings. The session also provides the most recent information on spine motion restriction.

 

Diabetic Emergencies – Pathophysiology, Assessment, and Management

Friday, 12:45 pm–1:45 pm, Ballroom C

This session provides a basic approach to understanding the pathophysiology, signs, and symptoms, and the recommended treatments in the various diabetic emergencies encountered in the prehospital environment.

 

Seizures – More Than a Convulsion

Saturday, 12:45 pm–1:45 pm, Ballroom B

This session provides a basic understanding of the pathophysiology associated with seizures, presentation of the various types of seizures, and prehospital management.

 

Clinical Insights – Making Your Assessment More Accurate

General Session

Saturday, 3:15 pm–4:15 pm, Grand Ballroom

Assessing and managing the prehospital patient could be quite challenging. This session provides clinical updates and “clinical insights” related to the assessment of the medical and trauma patient that allows you to apply better assessment techniques in the field.

 

                                               Doug Murdock, MD                                              

 

The Wilderness and You – Who Will Eat Who?

Pre-Conference Workshop

Wednesday, 8:00 am–5:00 pm

Predicaments come easy, but finding solutions often takes work and ingenuity. EMS calls often place us in situations that may require certain skills and training in order for us, and our patients, to make it home. Come to join us for a full day of training in backcountry medicine and survival. No pansy cushy classroom – this will be a day outside, where the elements will be against you and you WILL perform the things you learn. Classroom learning is fine and dandy – performing what you learn is a real education. Strictly limited to 30 individuals who don't mind getting their hands dirty, bloody, burnt and chilled.

 

 

                                                    Scott Bunker                                                    

 

Electrical Hazards

Thursday, 12:45 pm–1:45 pm, Ballroom C

Thursday, 2:00 pm–3:00 pm, Ballroom B

 

 

                                          Howard Reichman, MD                                        

 

Traumatic Brain Injuries

General Session

Saturday, 8:45 am–9:30 am, Grand Ballroom

A traumatic brain injury (TBI) is defined as a blow or force to the head or a penetrating head injury that disrupts the normal brain function. TBI can result when the head is suddenly shaken, hits an object or when an object pierces the skull and enters the brain tissue. In the 45-minute keynote lecture, Dr. Howard Reichman discusses signs and symptoms of TBI and mild cases that may result in a brief change in mental status or consciousness and severe cases that result in extended periods of unconsciousness, coma or even death.

 

                                                Mike Rhodes, MD                                               

 

OB Field Deliveries

Friday, 12:45 pm–1:45 pm, Cascade D

Recognition and management of a laboring woman. Assisting with an imminent precipitous vaginal delivery outside the hospital setting. Care and stabilization of the newborn, cord management, assessing Apgar scores, and delivery of the placenta. Equipment and supplies needed to aid in the delivery and aftercare of mom and baby.

 

Emergencies in OB Field Deliveries – What to Look for

Friday, 2:00 pm–3:00 pm, Ballroom C

Recognition and management of labor and delivery complications outside the hospital setting. Obstetrical medical problems, hypertension, diabetes, preeclampsia, and eclampsia. Management of shoulder dystocia, malpresentation, lacerations and maternal bleeding, and floppy or unresponsive baby.

 

                                                  Eric Rickenbach                                                 

 

Some Bad Places to Be In (on the Farm)

Thursday, 10:30 am–11:30 am, Cascade C

Friday, 2:00 pm–3:00 pm, Cascade E

Emergency responders need to recognize and initially manage (size-up) rescues involving the various farm confined-space emergencies that they may encounter while arriving at the scene of farm confined-space emergencies in their communities. Participants will learn to apply OSHA and NFPA standards to various farm-confined-space scenarios. This awareness-level training will teach responders how to efficiently and safely manage farm confined-space emergencies.

 

Are We Really on the Same Page?

Thursday, 12:45 pm–1:45 pm, Cascade D

As much as the members of the emergency services talk about teamwork, is that really the reality of how things work at a rescue scene? Whether your primary role is EMS, fire/rescue, law enforcement, 9-1-1 communications, or something else, this session will explore the often-forgotten interdependencies amongst all first and second responders. When there is a common operating picture, the management of the emergency scene will be better coordinated and result in a safer and more effective response.

 

Good Tractors are Red – Bad Tractors are Green

Thursday, 2:00 pm–3:00 pm, Cascade D

Saturday, 10:45 am – 11:45 am, Ballroom A

Agricultural tractors and machinery come in all shapes, sizes, and configurations. Even with this diversity, there are some common concerns, as well as approaches, when responding to a report of someone injured or trapped by these machines. This session will give EMS providers the basics to safely approach these types of incidents.

 

Farmers and EMS Providers – Cut from the Same Cloth

Friday, 10:30 am–11:30 am, Cascade E

While the jobs may be radically different, farmers and EMS providers share many of the same qualities and concerns. From fewer people doing the jobs to working in sometimes harsh and tough environments, both groups have challenges that test the mettle of even the most experienced. Examining these similarities will help both groups understand how to do their jobs better and safer.

 

Not Your Grandparents’ Automobile

General Session

Saturday, 8:00 am–8:45 am, Grand Ballroom

New vehicle technology is changing our approach to vehicle collision incidents. EMS providers need to understand how new vehicle construction, propulsion, and safety systems can affect extrication operations. The program focuses on the “need-to-know” information for street rescuers so that they can perform a safe and quick patient-oriented rescue in the modern road vehicle.

 

                                                   Lynn Schofield                                                  

 

Absolute Failure – When the 3 E’s Don’t Work

Saturday, 2:00 pm–3:00 pm, Ballroom B

What can public safety personnel learn from failure? A fire fatality represents a failure of one or more of the foundational principles of risk reduction. This session will look at fire fatalities and examine each to learn how these failures assist in improving life safety messages and evaluating risk reduction efforts. This presentation focuses on post fatal fire investigations examining human behavior, fire protection features, educational messaging and application, and enforcement of life safety codes. Participants will engage in a discussion of real-world fire scenarios and the decisions and factors that resulted in the loss of life.

 

                                                    Ed West, MD                                                   

 

Emergency Evacuations – Preparing for the Worst

Friday, 2:00 pm–3:00 pm, Cascade A–B

Saturday, 12:45 pm–1:45 pm, Cascade D

You often hear “that could never happen to me.”  Emergency evaluations and preparing for the worst is something we rarely discuss in detail. "Who, me? What? Is it ‘too little and too late?’" Come to attend this lecture as we discuss dealing with the mass number of lives that are affected by a catastrophic event. Learn from the effects in the past to affect the future.

 

Hospital Incident Command System and EMS – Working Together During the California Fires

General Session

Friday, 3:30 pm–4:45 pm, Grand Ballroom

During the disastrous California fires of 2017, an effective incident command system was critical for the emergency response system to work efficiently. We will discuss and evaluate hospital response, interaction with County EMS Command System and, above all, the valuable lessons we all learned.

 

PTSD – Rebuilding Lives of Survivors of the California Fires

Saturday, 2:00 pm–3:00 pm, Cascade D

Post Traumatic Stress Disorder!  This lecture defines PTSD and explains its different levels. Does it happen sooner or later? Are there interventions? We discuss the prognosis and resources that are available to those who suffer from PTSD.

 

                                                     Justin Young                                                    

 

Rescue Task Force

Pre-Conference Workshop

Wednesday, 8:00 am–5:00 pm

This course will address the training and principle guidelines needed for Fire/EMS agencies when tasked with responding to an Active Shooter/Critical Incident Event and can serve as a template for agencies looking for a way to organize a structured response using the Rescue Task Force (RTF) concept that is being introduced at the national level.

This single-day course covers principles of tactical trauma medicine that have been successful in reducing the mortality rate of victims in these types of scenarios as well as how EMS can work jointly with law enforcement to bridge the gap in getting critical medical aid to victims.

The course outline follows the IAFF’s endorsement on Active Shooter Event response and comprises the elements of the National Association of Emergency Medical Technicians (NAEMT) Tactical Combat Casualty Care (TCCC) program, as well as principles from FEMA’s Basic Response to an Active Shooter, Advanced Law Enforcement Rapid Response Training (ALERRT), and Law Enforcement Active Shooter Response (LASER).

Also, See the Provo Presenters Page

 

Dates for future “Provo SUMMITS” 

11/06/2019-11/09/2019

11/11/2020-11/14/2020

11/10/2021-11/13/2021

11/09/2022-11/12/2022

11/08/2023-11/11/2023

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